The Universal Life Church CEC – Detroit Composting Environmental Corps

OUR FIRST ORDER OF BUSINESS MANDATED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF – THE UNIVERSAL CHURCH OF ANGELIC JURISPRUDENCE: REGARDING!

Michigan Law Would Make Sustainable Development Illegal

Please contact your local state legislators, help us fight against this bill… Michigan Cities, Urban and Rural Gardner’s need your support!

http://www.democracy-tree.com/michigan-law-sustainable-development-illegal/

Posted on July 30, 2012 by admin

It’s hard to believe, but it’s true. Michigan Tea Party lawmaker, and former TV weatherman, Rep. Greg MacMaster (105th) has introduced legislation that would make it illegal for any governmental unit to promote or support sustainable development.

Patterned after a similar retrograde law recently passed in Alabama, Michigan’s new proposed legislation HB 5785 of 2012 (introduced on July 18th) would prevent any unit of government in Michigan from adopting any of the principles found in the United Nations Agenda 21 of 1992 — a non-binding and voluntary initiative that has been widely accepted and implemented throughout the United States and has enjoyed broad bi-partisan support, until the Tea Party turned it into a dirty word.

Why do they object to Agenda 21?

They believe it is a regulatory burden that will interfere with their property rights. Apparently Mr. MacMaster and his Tea Party friends don’t understand the meaning of the words “non-binding” and “voluntary”. So, in their confusion, they wish to limit our basic right to home rule by regulating our ability to pass so much as township ordinance that promotes any of the tenets of Agenda 21.

United Nations Agenda 21 of 1992

Links to Agenda 21 Chapters

عربي | 中文 | English |Français | Русский | Español

Table of Contents

Chapter

Paragraphs

1. Preamble 1.1 – 1.6

SECTION   I. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS

*see A/CONF.151/26/REV.1(VOL.I)
عربي | 中文 | English| Русский

A/CONF.151/26/REV.1(VOL.I)/CORR.1
عربي | 中文 | English| Français| Русский | Español

Chapter

Paragraphs

2. International cooperation to   accelerate sustainable development in developing countries and related   domestic policies 2.1 – 2.43
3. Combating poverty 3.1 – 3.12
4. Changing consumption patterns 4.1 – 4.27
5. Demographic dynamics and   sustainability 5.1 – 5.66
6 Protecting and promoting human   health conditions 6.1 – 6.46
7. Promoting sustainable human   settlement development 7.1 – 7.80
8. Integrating environment and   development in decision-making 8.1 – 8.54

SECTION   II. CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES FOR DEVELOPMENT

*see A/CONF.151/26/REV.1(VOL.II)
عربي | English

Chapter

Paragraphs

9. Protection of the atmosphere 9.1 – 9.35
10. Integrated approach to the planning   and management of land resources 10.1 – 10.18
11. Combating deforestation 11.1 – 11.40
12. Managing fragile ecosystems:   combating desertification and drought 12.1 – 12.63
13. Managing fragile ecosystems:   sustainable mountain development 13.1 – 13.24
14. Promoting sustainable agriculture   and rural development 14.1 – 14.104
15. Conservation of biological diversity 15.1 – 15.11
16. Environmentally sound management of   biotechnology 16.1 – 16.46
17. Protection of the oceans, all kinds   of seas, including enclosed and semi-enclosed seas, and coastal areas and the   protection, rational use and development of their living resources 17.1 – 17.136
18. Protection of the quality and supply   of freshwater resources: application of integrated approaches to the   development, management and use of water resources 18.1 – 18.90
19. Environmentally sound management of   toxic chemicals, including prevention of illegal international traffic in   toxic and dangerous products 19.1 – 19.76
20. Environmentally Sound Management of   Hazardous Wastes, Including Prevention of Illegal International Traffic in   Hazardous Wastes 20.1 – 20.46
21. Environmentally sound management of   solid wastes and sewage-related issues 21.1 – 21.49
22. Safe and environmentally sound   management of radioactive wastes 22.1 – 22.9

SECTION   III. STRENGTHENING THE ROLE OF MAJOR GROUPS

*see A/CONF.151/26   Vol. III

Chapter

Paragraphs

23. Preamble 23.1 – 23.4
24. Global action for women towards   sustainable and equitable development 24.1 – 24.12
25. Children and youth in sustainable   development 25.1 – 25.17
26. Recognizing and strengthening the   role of indigenous people and their communities 26.1 – 26.9
27. Strengthening the role of   non-governmental organizations: partners for sustainable development 27.1 – 27.13
28. Local authorities’ initiatives in   support of Agenda 21 28.1 – 28.7
29. Strengthening the role of workers   and their trade unions 29.1 – 29.14
30. Strengthening the role of business   and industry 30.1 – 30.30
31. Scientific and technological   community 31.1 – 31.12
32. Strengthening the role of farmers 32.1 – 32.14

SECTION   IV. MEANS OF IMPLEMENTATION

*see A/CONF.151/26   Vol. III

Chapter

Paragraphs

33. Financial resources and mechanisms 33.1 – 33.21
34. Transfer of environmentally sound   technology, cooperation and capacity-building 34.1 – 34.29
35. Science for sustainable development 35.1 – 35.25
36. Promoting education, public   awareness and training 36.1 – 36.27
37. National mechanisms and   international cooperation for capacity-building in developing countries 37.1 – 37.13
38. International institutional   arrangements 38.1 – 38.45
39. International legal instruments and   mechanisms 39.1 – 39.10
40. Information for decision-making 40.1 – 40.30
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